Risk Factors That May Lead to Divorce

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Risk Factors That May Lead to Divorce

divorce

Statistically speaking, approximately 50% of marriages will end in divorce. However, recent studies show that this “typical” percentage can be affected by a multitude of factors. The following are categories that often play a statistical role in the odds of a marriages success.

1. Age

Were you married as a late teen? Early twenties? Then your odds for divorce may be higher than your older counterparts. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, couples who marry between the ages of 20 and 25 increase their chance of divorce to 60%. Conversely, couples who marry after the age of 25 decrease their risk of divorce by almost 25%.

2. Financial and Educational Advancements
Studies also found that your financial situation, and your level of education, can affect your divorce odds. Adults bringing home less than $20,000 per year have an increased likelihood of divorce. However, couples who earn a yearly salary above $50,000 see a 30% decrease in risk. Married persons holding a college degree see a small decrease, around 13%, while men and women who have not completed high school see a 13% increase. Looking for a reason to earn that GED? To finish those last college courses? This may be it.

3. Family History
Surveys show that men and women who have divorced parents are more likely to also go through the divorce process. People whose parents remain married see a decrease. Parents aren’t the only family members who can affect your chances of divorce. Surprisingly, the gender and number of your children play a role in the success of your marriage. Couples with a firstborn daughter see a slight increase in risk (around 5%). Couples with multiples, such as twins or triplets, also see an increased risk.

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